OneDrive to rule them all

Four and a half years ago, I managed to get one of the free STACK 1GB cloud storage, and I’ve been using it since — mostly for storing my collection of RPG PDFs. Through the various clients I can access them on any device, which certainly is convenient!
There is also a paid version, and the difference is that the paid versions of STACK are backed up — so if there’s any data loss on a free STACK, you’re out of luck and you’ve lost that data forever. Which happened earlier this year — not to me, but to a few other free users. And a few weeks ago, as more and more drives that are used for the free level of STACK are nearing their end-of-life, the provider decided that they do not want to provide a service that’s not backed up — for sure, it doesn’t look good for your services when you start losing vast amounts of user data! So they decided that they’re stopping with the free level of STACK, and offered a very reasonably priced upgrade to the paid version.

Of course, that also prompted me to investigate alternatives. There are quite a few alternatives, but most of them were more expensive than the upgrade offer from STACK itself. One interesting option was a Swiss company that offered a “life-time subscription” for a flat fee, which also would allow me to carve up the storage and pass those individual accounts onto others to use — but it was a lot of money, and if “life-time” means as much to them as the “life-time free STACK” lasted, then it’s not worth it.

And then someone mentioned OneDrive, the cloud storage solution from Microsoft. It’s part of Office365 — I use it extensively in my work. And it just so happens that I am the administrator of an Office365 “family” account.
Back in 2014, Klik needed office software, and she bought Word and Excel 2010. Those are running out of support, so she would need to buy new versions. As a principle, I prefer to buy “software to own”, but if you want to get MS Office for two machines (her desktop and her laptop), then the price becomes quite steep indeed, and a “business subscription” becomes a viable alternative. I found a good price for it somewhere. But for only a few euros more, we could get a “family” subscription for six people in total, who could install the software on up to five machines each. So we would be able to give out licenses to my father and to Klik’s mother and sister — at no additional cost.

So that’s what we did. And since I run Linux myself, I don’t have any use for MS Office software, but it was more practical to make me administrator of the group account.

And it turns out that each of the six accounts in the group get a OneDrive account with 1TB storage each. And with the unofficial client for Linux I can use it on my desktop and laptop too. Problem solved.

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